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Intelligence and the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

The blame for the attack on Pearl Harbor cannot be laid solely on intelligence failures. The Pearl Harbor investigations affixed plenty of blame to faulty leadership, inflexible policies and procedures, and overall complacency after more than two decades of peace. These same investigations, however, called attention to the long overlooked concepts that intelligence work not only required expert personnel and continuity in time of peace, but that it also should be recognized as an essential function of command.

OPSEC Precautions For This Site

Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/movies/jason-bourne-proves-why-computers-are-the-worst-thing-to-happen-to-the-spy-thriller-since-no-more-day-to-day-formalwear

Things to keep in mind when interacting with The Lint Center, particularly when leaving comments or uploading photos:

  1. Defense conditions are classified secret, while force protection conditions are unclassified.
  2. Vulnerability of oconus installations to sabotage or penetration is classified secret if U.S. Intelligence information is made.
  3. The identity of units planned for deployment is confidential until an official announcement of the deployment is made.
  4. General geographic location of units deployed ( I.E. City, Country or Area) is unclassified.
  5. Specific geographic location of units deployed is confidential.
  6. Details of allied military participation in operations are secret.

The Global reach of the World Wide Web requires special precautions to be taken when posting information. The following types of information will not be posted publicly on WarriorLodge.com and will be taken down immediately:

  • Information that is for official use only (FOUO). This type of information would pose an unacceptable risk to the US Military, especially in electronically aggregated form. While records containing FOUO information will normally be marked at the time of their creation, records that do not bare such markings shall be assumed to contain FOUO information.
  • Analysis and recommendations concerning lessons learned which would reveal sensitive military operations, exercises or vulnerabilities.
  • Reference to unclassified information that would reveal sensitive movements of military assets or the location of units, installations, or personnel where uncertainty regarding location is an element of a military plan or program.
  • Personal information including compilations of names or personnel assigned overseas, sensitive, or routinely deployable units.
  • Names, locations, and specific identifying information about family members of military and government employees.
  • Highly technical information that can be used or be adapted for use to design, engineer, product, manufacture, operate, repair, overhaul, or reproduce any military or space equipment or technology concerning such equipment.
  • Unclassified information pertaining to classified programs. The clearance review procedures for unclassified information pertaining to classified programs proposed for posting to a publicly accessible web sites must take into account the likelihoods of classification compilation.

So, let’s review…

  1. Don’t discuss current or future deployment destinations.
  2. Don’t discuss current or future operations or missions.
  3. Don’t discuss current or future dates and times of when service members will be in deployed, in-port or conducting exercises.
  4. Don’t discuss readiness issues and numbers.
  5. Don’t discuss specific training equipment.
  6. Don’t discuss people’s names and billets in conjunction with operations.
  7. Don’t speculate about current or future operations.
  8. Don’t spread rumors about current, future, or past operations or movements.
  9. Don’t assume the enemy is not trying to collect information on you; they are… right now.  Seriously.
  10. Be smart, use your head, and always think OPSEC when using email, phone, chat rooms and message boards.

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Operations Security: 1. A systematic, proven process by which a government, organization, or individual can identify, control, and protect generally unclassified information about an operation/activity and, thus, deny or mitigate an adversary’s/competitor’s ability to compromise or interrupt said operation/activity (NSC 1988). 2. OPSEC is a process of identifying critical information and subsequently analyzing friendly actions attendant to military operations and other activities to (a) identify those actions that can be observed by adversary intelligence systems, (b) determine indicators adversary intelligence systems might obtain that could be interpreted or pieced together to derive critical information in time to be useful to adversaries, and select and execute measures that eliminate or reduce to an acceptable level the vulnerabilities of friendly actions to adversary exploitation (DOD JP 1994; JCS 1997).

Operations Security process: An analytical process that involves five components: identification of critical information, analysis of threats, analysis of vulnerabilities, assessment of risks, and application of appropriate countermeasures (NSC 1988).

Source: http://www.ioss.gov/glossary.html#o

Lint Center Announces Virtual Archive for National Security (LC-VANS)

Lint Center Announces Virtual Archive for National Security (LC-VANS)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE         7/29/2016

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit organization focused on supporting

the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and

mentoring opportunities, today is pleased to announce the launch of its new Virtual Archive for

National Security.

 

It was only nine years after the devastation at Pearl Harbor in 1941 and no one believed that a

surprise attack could happen to U.S. forces ever again. But it did,” observed James R. Lint,

Founder and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “The surprise attack by

communist forces from the North in Korea, sparking the Korean War, changed American

national security assessments, as it helped to crystalize the implications of strategic surprise in

geopolitics as well as to American security interests globally.”

 

The Lint Center Virtual Archive for National Security (LC-VANS) strives to voice, catalog, and

document the experiences of veterans, contractors, and civilian workers involved in major

pivotal points in U.S. national security and international affairs. By providing a resource to

students, historians and observers alike the Lint Center seeks to provide the information and

historical record necessary to ensure that pivotal mistakes are not repeated and so that America

does not see the vulnerability of biases enabling strategic surprises perpetuated.

 

The Lint Center for National Security Studies desires to preserve the histories of individuals who

actively shaped and developed the history of the National Security of the United States as it

presently stands.

 

Your experience as a veteran, contractor, or civil service member is essential to help others

understand how enemies can see the possibility to advance due to recent drawbacks, especially in

an early period of an emerging war.

 

“Being in the national security career field is not an easy profession,” Lint adds. “No one hears

about the minor successes, but everyone knows mistakes can be costly. We can now learn from

our mistakes, in order to confront similar situations where enemies may see a window of

vulnerability.”

 

LC-VANS allows you to submit your story in two ways as we collect and receive content in

these primary ways.

Submissions from the community about an interesting topic via the Contact Form.

Personal story submissions or interviews via Submit Your Story Form.

This press release was prepared by Lint Center volunteer, Stephanie Balepogi.

 

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c)

(3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students

pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military

intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority

operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more

information, please visit http://www.lintcenter.org/.

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Lint Center Scholarship Deadlines 30 Jan & 30 July

Scholarship Deadlines Are Coming Soon

Share this flyer with the scholarship deadlines.

Lint Center Scholarship Deadlines 30 Jan & 30 July

Lint Center Scholarship Deadlines 30 Jan & 30 July