Army Intelligence Soldiers post Iraqi positions on a map during Operation Desert Storm.
By Ruth Quinn

Army Intelligence Soldiers post Iraqi positions on one of the large-scale maps used during Operation DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM. (US Army photo)

A new dedicated flag at the National Infantry…
A new dedicated flag at the National Infantry Museum commemorates Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.
By Vince Little, The Bayonet

A new dedicated flag at the National Infantry... A new dedicated flag at the National Infantry Museum commemorates Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

Desert Storm/Desert Shield

Operation Desert Storm began on January 17, 1991, at 0300 hours (1900 hours of January 16, Eastern Standard Time). It was a direct result of the invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein on August 2, 1990. American President George H. W. Bush immediately condemned the Iraqi action, as did the governments of Great Britain and the Soviet Union. Hussein, unconcerned about these protests, gambled that his fellow Arab states would stand by and either support or ignore his act of aggression. He was wrong. Two-thirds of the 21 members of the Arab League condemned the invasion, with Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd turning to the United States and other members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) for help. Six days later, US Air Force fighter planes began landing in Saudi Arabia as part of a massive build-up of troops and equipment that was known as Operation Desert Shield. Intelligence Center Provides Support to Desert Shield/Desert Storm  Army MI article.

Gulf War tribute kicks off Memorial Day weekend  By Vince Little, The Bayonet  (Flag photo above is from this article.)

Two decades ago, U.S. and coalition forces shoved Iraq out of Kuwait in relatively rapid fashion to claim an overwhelming victory in the Gulf War. The first national ceremony honoring the 382 American men and women who gave their lives took place Thursday.
The National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center hosted a 20th anniversary tribute to the troops killed during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. It was part of Fort Benning’s Memorial Day commemoration and coincided with the basic training graduation of C Company, 2nd Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment, at the museum parade field.

We are looking for participants!

Please send your information, story or pictures for this time in history. http://lc-vans.lintcenter.org/submit-your-story/

Cold War -513th Military Intelligence Brigade Patch 513th Military Intelligence Brigade Patch[/caption]

Please send your information, story or pictures for this time in history. http://lc-vans.lintcenter.org/submit-your-story/

Army Intelligence Soldiers post Iraqi positions on one of the large-scale maps used during Operation DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM. (US Army photo)

Buildup for Operation DESERT STORM

On August 2, 1990, the Iraqi Republican Guard invaded the neighboring country of Kuwait. Within 48 hours, the military force had established a defensive line along the Saudi Arabian border. The United Nations (UN) issued a warning to Iraqi dictator, Saddam ussein, to remove his troops from Kuwait by January 15, 1991, or face a full attack by a multi-national force. Tension in the region remained high as Saudi Arabia anticipated an Iraqi offensive on its oil fields and ports in the Persian Gulf.

513th MI Bde

513th Military Intelligence Brigade in Operations DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM

Vigilant Knights in the Desert On 2 August 1990, Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait and threatened Saudi Arabia. Four days later, the Army alerted the 513th Military Intelligence Brigade for eventual deployment as part of Operation DESERT SHIELD. By the end of the month, its first elements arrived in Saudi Arabia. Eventually, the brigade’s deployed strength ballooned to […]

Operation DESERT OWL Provides Linguists for First Gulf War

With the outbreak of the first Gulf War, the US Army realized it had a shortage of Soldiers proficient in Arabic. The US Army’s 267 Arabic linguists, trained in Syrian, Egyptian, and other Persian Gulf dialects, had already deployed to Saudi Arabia in late 1990 to serve with the XVIII Airborne Corps. When the Army committed a second corps to the conflict, it faced an additional requirement for more than 900 linguists. The 142nd MI Battalion (Utah National Guard) deployed its Arabic speakers as reinforcements, but the need for more linguists could not be satisfied, even partially, until the middle of the following year.